QR codes are pretty neat v. error correction

#1

We are starting to play around a lot with QR codes here at work, so I decided to play around with one, and see what could be done for a personal website. I was thinking of maybe having a vinyl made and placing the final version onto my car. Here is a basic QR code, generated directly from http://qrcode.kaywa.com/.

#2

Cool stuff :tup:

#3

nerd

#4

I Just made this one, should work right?

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v398/Thorguitarist/QR_goatse.png

#5

HAHAHA!

#6

Hahaha, nice. You could get it to work, I’m sure!

#7

Seriously fantastic idea. I’ll likely use a similar format for my shop. Thanks!

#8

LOL @ ProgRocker!!!

#9

A few years back I looked into the possibility of cutting vinyl QR code decals… And yes, the error correction is quite great.

The smallest I could get one to work was 6", for a somewhat long URL based QR. They’re are a BITCH to cut and weed, however.
I don’t know how I feel about killing that much of the error correction with some sort of image covering portions of it, sounds like it may lead to errors…
I would prefer using a extremely short URL to redirect, making the QR contain very few bits. Very crude looking QR codes can have a great deal of visual impact, if you ask me.

For a large decal, say 12+ inches, it wouldn’t really be that much of a issue. The larger the better.

#10

It’s a vector graphic, so it could be 12", or 100 x 100 pixels, and do the same thing. Size shouldn’t matter as long as the reader can tell the bits apart.

And, killing error correction for an image can lead to errors, but that is why you test it while you create it. The image will stay the same after created, so as long as it works when you finish it, it will work later.

Lastly, you should almost always go through a intermediate site such as bit.ly, so that you can track hits from that media, and see how much traffic you drive to your site via QR marketing vs. other venues.

–mark

#11

I don’t mean you need to make it large to be scannable… Im saying you cant make a QR code out of vinyl thats tiny, unless its printed. But printed decals fade more rapidly, cost more, and you cant see through them. Depends on what you are looking to do with it. If you intend on putting a image on the decal, then yes it would need to be printed.

Also, I’m not entirely sure that ANY QR application will read every single QR code exactly the same. I have used some iOS QR apps that couldn’t read simple codes unless they were perfect. The better ones don’t struggle with a error or two. The error correction is there to account for this. And by removing a section, you are really testing out the error correction and at the very least reducing its effectiveness.

I like the fact that you have absolutely no idea what a QR code is until you scan it.

#12

Ahh, yeah, I don’t have any experience with vinyl printing. I could imagine non-printing of small objects is a bitch though!

#13

If you have a white car, you should cut only the black parts on the QR code and put it on the white car!! I think that would look sweet

#14

I just built a quick mobile website that would be used for displaying the car’s mod list from a QR code scan. Just started messing around with mobile web, so I don’t have the orientation recognition working properly yet, but it should look good on iOS and android phones. This would be something you could put on your window at a car show, and then anyone with a smart phone and QR code software could find out quickly about your car.

It hides the address bar on load, to reclaim 60 pixels of viewing area, and minimal scrolling and no zooming is necessary.

–mark

#15

Sounds like a nice shopping list for car thief’s.

#16

Valid point, but at a car show, popping your hood would also be a nice shopping list for car thief’s!

It’s a digital alternative to people who at car shows, put a poster up in their window or engine bay, showing off their car, which happens at EVERY car show.

#17

BUMP.

Quick question for you guys: Do people actually use QR codes anymore?

I ask because I’m having documents made up which have them on there… but I’ve never once used this shit and don’t know anyone who really does either. If I remove the QR code from the document I’ll have significantly more room.

#18

Cant you downsize the QR code? We use pin-stamped them for equipment tagging and they’re only .5" square.
We link ours to the manual for the piece of equipment.

#19

Well here’s the thing. The code is supposed to pre-populate whatever messaging app you use with a phone number… and it doesn’t exactly work that way. It actually takes longer to scan the code and select the proper app than it does just to open your messaging app and put in the number manually. And that’s if you know how to use a QR code which it seems most people I’ve talked to do not.

I’ve decided to not include them.

#20

We use them for serial numbers and manufacturing info on parts, I think one of mine is 0.25" square.