Inground Pool - Questions/Recommendations


#21

we have like a 20x50 pool lol. upkeep is fucking retarded. Also our cover ripped during one winter and they wanted like 2k or something retarded for a new one. I am pretty sure we dont even cover it anymore, dont have a solar cover either. just be careful while draining the pool for winter because it will tend to pull the liner down if you"re doing it wrong.

they also make textured liners if you’re worried about slipping, but they hurt your feet. if anyone is crying about slipping tell them they should learn how to swim, or gtfo and stfu


#22

Agree, salt water is the only way to go if you are spending the money on a new install, 10x less maintenance and always clear water. The salt water is more comparable to contact saline solution, its not like ocean water.

How much reduction from haggling are we talking, like $500-1k? We looked at doing electrical ourselves and it was going to cut around $1k off the price.


#23

Just as an FYI,

NYS has recently adopted the 2008 national electrical codes. There were many changes made in regards to wiring of filtration systems and the grounding of the pool itself. Just a heads up. You can wire yourself or hire a company. Just be aware of the changes and make sure the contractor is as well. If a picky inspector finds his way into your backyard, he can shut your pool down in a hurry. Some things are easy fixes, but putting a grounding loop and plate on an in-ground pool with a poured cement deck is next to impossible once the concrete is in place.


#24

sounds like they will be learning to swim pretty quick then…


#25

Yes, we are aware of the changes…materials alone were going to run ~$600 doing it ourselves (father in-law and best friend are both licensed electricians).

Any other NYSpeeders out there with inground pools or know of a friend/family member who installs them???


#26

As far as haggling goes, get an itemized quote and see what you can contract out to a friend or that you can do.

And don’t overlook the previously mentioned electricity codes. They can be super pricey for above grounds too.


#27

Parents have a gunite pool and it did have to be resurfaced…I’d guess somwhere in that 10-15 year range and it was not cheap. I think The original plaster job may have been shitty. Its got a way nicer coating on it now that looks better, is less abrasive and I’d guess is more durable.


#28

bumping this…Next house I buy will either have an inground or one will be put in. Right now I’m trying to decipher what I’m more comfortable with. If the house already has one, it will have to be fiberglass or vinyl, not dealing with gunite. But I’m still weary of the longevity/potential issues down the road, this is where I’m not quite educated on the life of inground pools. So then there’s the consideration of buying a house and having an inground pool installed (which is the direction I’m currently leaning towards). Curious for input on either side. Would love to hear from anyone who has had one installed or who knows of someone in the business.


#29

If you have the option, buy a house with a pool. You’re going to spend 30k+ on an inground pool (and way + if you go nuts) and unlike spending 40k on a kitchen this will NOT be adding 40k in value to the home. They say what ever you spend on a pool you better get back out in value because you’re never going to recover it when you sell.

I have an inground liner pool that came with the house and love it. I’d rather have a gunnite or fiberglass but the liner is pretty easy to deal with and isn’t a huge expense to replace every 10-15 years


#30

I appreciate your input @JayS, it’s nice to hear the perspective of someone who bought a house with a pre-existing inground. One question I have not been able to find an answer to in my limited research is how long do they typically last?
I’m not talking about the life of the liner vs having to resurface gunite vs the more “maintenance free” fiberglass. I’m talking structurally, at what age of the inground pool does one start to get concerned that a total removal/replacement is necessary? Or is that not even a thing to worry about in most cases?
It’d be great to find a home where the current homeowner was the one who had the pool built/installed so that there’s some historically accurate info on its maintenance, but that is not always the case. My nightmare would be buying a house with an inground pool but then shortly thereafter finding out there’s severe structural issues that warrant a removal/replacement. But I don’t know how likely that even is.


#31

With a liner I think they last forever. When you replace the liner you just use Portland cement to repair the bits that have gotten bad and drop in a new liner. When I did my liner 14 years ago Majestic wanted 2500 to do it and they sold me the liner for $900. Took me a day to install it with a couple friends, including patching up the cement. It’s almost time to do the liner again.


#32

$30k for a pool? i have buddies up here that spent $80k cdn and it’ still just a regular pool.

fuuuck that.

my wife keeps asking for one and i keep saying no. for the price of doing a nice pool up here we could put a serious deposit down on a nice condo in FL.


#33

Buying a house with a pool > buying a house and installing.

BUT.

Buying a house without a pool and having cool neighbors with a pool is your best bet.


#34

My pool is Lake Erie.


#35

I bought a house that has an inground pool. I think it does add value. I would have paid less for my house if it did not have a pool… just sayin.

Anyway, mine is a liner pool, 35,000 gallon, roughly 10’ deep, diving board, slide, “spa” attached, etc. I’ve had a rough few years with it, mine is 15 years old, and I replaced the Filter with a DE one last year, the Heater this year, and bought a mesh cover last year. (that’s like $6-7K) but I would do it again in a heartbeat. I don’t think I really favor one over the other. I am thinking about changing my liner to go to a nicer blue color, which is nice about a liner pool.

Either way, it’s nice to have and enjoy in the summer. My friends and their kids love it too.

X…


#36

This too. I’m thinking about going a darker liner this time to give it more of a lake/lagoon feel.


#37

I’d think a darker liner would keep the pool warmer when it’s in sunlight, right?


#38

A little I would think. I’ve read that gray liners will actually look dark blue at depth, like this:


#39

At that point just go full black:


#40

Platinum Onyx is actually the one I’m probably going with.